Sunday, June 04, 2006

And only the blind shall see....

Good Sunday morning to all! Today is bright and sunny in my neck of the woods, and I managed to get a bit of gardening done before the sun hit me and got a little too warm.

I tried a listening exercise yesterday that I used to do on my nature walks in Yosemite. If you are a clutterer or just have too much stuff in your house, you may want to try this to gain a new perspective.

I sat quietly at a public park and closed my eyes, listening carefully for sounds around me. I had a paper and pen, and I drew a "sound map" of every little thing I heard. The only human sounds I heard were cars and a few people talking. Other things were dogs barking, an airplane overhead, many birds chirping or singing all over the place, the wind in the trees and I felt the wind on my face.

When I opened my eyes, I was surprised to see a number of things I hadn't heard. There was a guy riding his bike by the park, a man walking his dog, and another man sitting quietly on a bench.

I realized that this exercise of listening had also enhanced my ability to see. I was suddenly more aware, and even more curious to see what was around me. So many things had become "invisible" to me and it took me closing my eyes, to enable me to see them once again.

Have piles of "stuff" in your house or office become invisible? They haven't disappeared, they are still there--your eyes just don't see them anymore.

Maybe this means we need to take a moment and close our eyes in our homes. Listen for sounds, then open our eyes anew to what surrounds us.

Do we truly want those piles? Wouldn't we rather they disappear (by us de-cluttering) than have them become invisible?

Organize in Harmony

Friday, June 02, 2006

Happy June everyone! A wonderful idea came over me the other day about how to help people unclutter their lives. Years ago, when I first tried backpacking, I remember feeling the incredible elation that came from being able to survive for a few days with just this stuff on my back.

I swore I didn't need anything more than I could carry myself, and vowed to not collect so much "stuff" in my life. Now of course, I didn't pare down quite like that, and over the years, yes, I did manage to collect "stuff." But I sure do remember that feeling I had and the sense of freedom and empowerment.

I later became a park ranger, and met lots of people who lived without so much stuff. The land around them, the people they loved, the travelling they could do--these were the important things in their lives and their priorities kept them living light. (That, and the National Park Service salary!)

Getting back to that ethic seems even more important to me now--and I'm wondering how to help my clients get that same feeling--without having to actually go backpacking.

How about just walks in the woods? You're supposed to look at something green every now and then to clear your brain. Feeling nature under our feet, smelling it in our noses and hearing the natural sounds of life--all these things have always helped me clear my cluttered head--maybe it can help others clear their cluttered homes and offices?

Organize with Mother Nature? I think it could work.

The Mother Nature Organizer
Organize in Harmony